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#1

 

STAN
HACK

 by Mark McDermott/BaseballSacramento.com 

 S_Hack4

Nickname: “Smiling Stan”  

Born: December 6, 1909 

Died: December 15, 1979 

High School: Sacramento 

Bats: Left—Throws: Right 

Height: 6-0—Weight: 170 

Position: Third Base 

Debut: April 12, 1932 

Last Game:  September 24, 1947 

Teams: Chicago Cubs 1932-1947 

 

 

 

 




“Smiling Stan” was the best third baseman of his time. He played 16 seasons, all with the Chicago Cubs, and appeared in four All-Star Games and four World Series.  

 S_Hack1
Born in 1909, he worked in a bank and played semi-pro ball until he caught on with the Sacramento Solons. His .353 batting average with the Solons in 1931 caught the eye of Cubs president Bill Veeck, Sr. who traveled to the West Coast, was impressed and signed the 20-year-old. 

In 1934 at age 25, Hack became a Cubs fixture at third base. A patient leadoff hitter, six times he would hit better than .300 and seven times score more than 100 runs in a season. His best season was 1941, batting .317 with 33 doubles, 99 walks and .417 on-base percentage in a league where the average batting mark was .258 and on-base percentage .326. 

Hack broke into the major leagues during the Cubs’ 1932 pennant-winning campaign. The team won again in 1935 and 1938. That 1938 season, he had a .320 average, walked 94 times, had 11 triples and finished seventh in the National League MVP voting. 

No one stole many bases in Hack’s heyday. During the five-year period from 1936-40, he led the league in stolen bases twice and was second three times. An excellent glove man, he led the N.L. in putouts five times, fielding percentage three times and assists twice. He also finished second in assists six times. 

After the 1943 season, Hack retired partly because he didn’t get along with manager Jimmy Williams. Williams was fired 14 games into the 1944 season and replaced by Charlie Grimm whose first order of business was to talk Hack out of retirement. 

Two years later at age 35, Hack hit a career-high .323, walked 99 times, scored 111 runs and led the Cubs to the pennant for the fourth time. In the 1945 World Series, he had 11 hits and four walks in a seven-game loss to the Detroit Tigers. In his four World Series appearances, he hit .348 in 18 games. When he finished playing in 1949, he had tied the then-record for most years as a N.L. third baseman (16).  

S_Hack3

Stan (above) is taking his hacks during spring training in 1937 when the Cubs trained on Catalina Island. The fellow bent over adjusting his radio equipment is WHO  reporter, Ronald "Dutch" Reagan. That summer, Reagan took a screen test in Hollywood and began a new career.
H

Hack never fared well in the Hall of Fame voting. In the time period from 1900-1950, third basemen didn’t earn much respect, Hack
among them. His 2,193 hits wasn’t close to the magic 3,000, his 1,239 runs scored wasn’t close to the magic 1,500 and his .301 career average didn’t impress voters because he was a singles hitter. It’s important to note that there are fewer third basemen enshrined in Cooperstown than any other position. 

An opposing player once said that Hack “has more friends than Leo Durocher has enemies.” Stan liked people and liked to have fun even more. He was known to party in his early career and reportedly was often carried home by drinking partner Pat Malone. 

Veeck turned Hack’s captivating smile and fan appeal into a Cubs promotion. He once walked the Wrigley Field bleachers selling a grinning picture of Hack on the back of a mirror with the slogan, “Smile with Stan Hack.” However, the fans began shining the mirrors in opposing players’ eyes, prompting the umpires to confiscate the giveaways and threaten to forfeit the game. 

  Career Statistics -- Stan Hack



Year 

Team 

Avg 

AB 

2B 

3B 

HR 

RBI 

SB 

BB 

SO 

OBP 

SLG 

OPS 

TB 

1932 

CHI C 

.236 

72 

178 

32 

42 

19 

17 

16 

.306 

.365 

.671 

65 

1933 

CHI C 

.350 

20 

60 

10 

21 

.451 

.483 

.934 

29 

1934 

CHI C 

.289 

111 

402 

54 

116 

16 

21 

11 

45 

42 

.363 

.366 

.729 

147 

1935 

CHI C 

.311 

124 

427 

75 

133 

23 

64 

14 

65 

17 

.406 

.436 

.842 

186 

1936 

CHI C 

.298 

149 

561 

102 

167 

27 

78 

17 

89 

39 

.396 

.392 

.788 

220 

1937 

CHI C 

.297 

154 

582 

106 

173 

27 

63 

16 

83 

42 

.388 

.375 

.762 

218 

1938 

CHI C 

.320 

152 

609 

109 

195 

34 

11 

67 

16 

94 

39 

.411 

.432 

.843 

263 

1939 

CHI C 

.298 

156 

641 

112 

191 

28 

56 

17 

65 

35 

.364 

.398 

.762 

255 

1940 

CHI C 

.317 

149 

603 

101 

191 

38 

40 

21 

75 

24 

.395 

.439 

.834 

265 

1941 

CHI C 

.317 

151 

586 

111 

186 

33 

45 

10 

99 

40 

.417 

.427 

.844 

250 

1942 

CHI C 

.300 

140 

553 

91 

166 

36 

39 

94 

40 

.402 

.409 

.811 

226 

1943 

CHI C 

.289 

144 

533 

78 

154 

24 

35 

82 

27 

.384 

.366 

.750 

195 

1944 

CHI C 

.282 

98 

383 

65 

108 

16 

32 

53 

21 

.369 

.352 

.722 

135 

1945 

CHI C 

.323 

150 

597 

110 

193 

29 

43 

12 

99 

30 

.420 

.405 

.826 

242 

1946 

CHI C 

.285 

92 

323 

55 

92 

13 

26 

83 

32 

.431 

.350 

.781 

113 

1947 

CHI C 

.271 

76 

240 

28 

65 

11 

12 

41 

19 

.377 

.333 

.711 

80 

16 

Totals 

.301 

1938 

7278 

1239 

2193 

363 

81 

57 

642 

165 

1092 

466 

.394 

.397 

.791 

2889 

 
   
01/29/2011

All contents © Rick Cabral 2011

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